The Writer's Block

News and Reviews from Marcus J. Moore
"For The Infinite Void, [Bernard] Farley has said he wanted to journey through the universe and tell its story. He delivers with a set of cosmic, cavernous tunes that reach for the stars but, gratifyingly, don’t always rely on the cinematic touch that Farley so clearly loves to deploy.
Farley’s theme slowly comes into view as the album progresses, and even the dancefloor-ready bangers take a few listens to fully absorb. In attempting to explain the cosmos, Farley’s instead created his own utopia. Wherever it is, it’s beyond this world.”
— Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

"For The Infinite Void, [Bernard] Farley has said he wanted to journey through the universe and tell its story. He delivers with a set of cosmic, cavernous tunes that reach for the stars but, gratifyingly, don’t always rely on the cinematic touch that Farley so clearly loves to deploy.

Farley’s theme slowly comes into view as the album progresses, and even the dancefloor-ready bangers take a few listens to fully absorb. In attempting to explain the cosmos, Farley’s instead created his own utopia. Wherever it is, it’s beyond this world.”

Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

“Doe Cigapom doesn’t reject what he’s done to survive, or how he feels about the city’s changing demographics. He robbed people and did unsavory things in the old D.C., the ‘Dodge City’ with the high murder rate.
Consequently, Life as We Know It is introspective and attainable, a vast chronicle of inner-city existence that conveys the struggles of everyday people and their attempts to overcome despair.
It’s an offering for the laid-off Metro worker, the hard-working single parent, and the displaced D.C. native. Those hardships aren’t just germane to the city, of course. Real life happens everywhere.”
— Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

Doe Cigapom doesn’t reject what he’s done to survive, or how he feels about the city’s changing demographics. He robbed people and did unsavory things in the old D.C., the ‘Dodge City’ with the high murder rate.

Consequently, Life as We Know It is introspective and attainable, a vast chronicle of inner-city existence that conveys the struggles of everyday people and their attempts to overcome despair.

It’s an offering for the laid-off Metro worker, the hard-working single parent, and the displaced D.C. native. Those hardships aren’t just germane to the city, of course. Real life happens everywhere.”

Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

“Friday night’s show wasn’t just a victory for Nas, it was a victory for his fans, too. It was a proud occasion for everyone who remembers the first time they heard Nas on ‘Live at the BBQ,’ and watched his video, ‘It Ain’t Hard to Tell,’ on BET’s ‘Rap City.’
It was a noble gala for both aging b-boys and younger listeners. This was an achievement for one of rap’s good guys and the genre as a whole.”
— Marcus J. Moore, Washington Post

Friday night’s show wasn’t just a victory for Nas, it was a victory for his fans, too. It was a proud occasion for everyone who remembers the first time they heard Nas on ‘Live at the BBQ,’ and watched his video, ‘It Ain’t Hard to Tell,’ on BET’s ‘Rap City.’

It was a noble gala for both aging b-boys and younger listeners. This was an achievement for one of rap’s good guys and the genre as a whole.”

Marcus J. Moore, Washington Post

"The charm of Schoolboy Q can be narrowed to one word, repeated multiple times over the hardest groove you can find.
“YAWK! YAWK! YAWK! YAWK!”
Who knows what it means, and, really, who cares? It’s Schoolboy’s signature, an extremely catchy buzzword that’s even more addictive with scores of young people yelling it in unison.”
— Marcus J. Moore, Washington Post

"The charm of Schoolboy Q can be narrowed to one word, repeated multiple times over the hardest groove you can find.

YAWK! YAWK! YAWK! YAWK!

Who knows what it means, and, really, who cares? It’s Schoolboy’s signature, an extremely catchy buzzword that’s even more addictive with scores of young people yelling it in unison.”

Marcus J. Moore, Washington Post

"While G  I  R  L is too surface-level at times, it hits the target it’s aimed for. Pharrell wants summertime airplay, and any of these songs could survive on the radio. It’s also a nice tribute to feminine vigor, adding another notch to his ever-growing list of achievements. He has plenty to be happy about these days.” — Marcus J. Moore, HipHopDX

"While G I R L is too surface-level at times, it hits the target it’s aimed for. Pharrell wants summertime airplay, and any of these songs could survive on the radio. It’s also a nice tribute to feminine vigor, adding another notch to his ever-growing list of achievements. He has plenty to be happy about these days.” — Marcus J. Moore, HipHopDX

"On White Sands, Homeboy Sandman brightens the dark edges with fluid rhymes that mask the EP’s true intent, which—like every Sandman release—takes several listens to fully absorb. Maybe Rap Genius will get it right this time.” — Marcus J. Moore, HipHopDX

"On White Sands, Homeboy Sandman brightens the dark edges with fluid rhymes that mask the EP’s true intent, which—like every Sandman release—takes several listens to fully absorb. Maybe Rap Genius will get it right this time.” — Marcus J. Moore, HipHopDX

"With Ghosts, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. [It] should soundtrack your next rave. Or some other party where the patrons are too stoned to move properly.” — Marcus J. Moore, MTV

"With Ghosts, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. [It] should soundtrack your next rave. Or some other party where the patrons are too stoned to move properly.” — Marcus J. Moore, MTV

This is easily my favorite song right now.

"Layers of Thought" by The Breathing Effect. The opening track of their impressive self-titled EP, out Feb. 11.

This song = ! ! ! ! ! ! !

“Jay Z shrugs at your cries for him to abandon Barney’s department store because, well, that would take money out of his pockets. Blue Ivy’s gotta eat and baby caviar is expensive.” — Marcus J. Moore, Monumental Network

Jay Z shrugs at your cries for him to abandon Barney’s department store because, well, that would take money out of his pockets. Blue Ivy’s gotta eat and baby caviar is expensive.” — Marcus J. Moore, Monumental Network