The Writer's Block

News and Reviews from Marcus J. Moore
"Rock Konducta Pt. 2 doesn’t have the immediate impact of Pt. 1, but it’s still rewarding. Much like his other output, Pt. 2 shows that Madlib has never lost his love of crate digging, even after the countless projects he’s released over the years. He’s still ambitious, just as restless and refuses to clean up his sound.” — Marcus J. Moore, HipHopDX

"Rock Konducta Pt. 2 doesn’t have the immediate impact of Pt. 1, but it’s still rewarding. Much like his other output, Pt. 2 shows that Madlib has never lost his love of crate digging, even after the countless projects he’s released over the years. He’s still ambitious, just as restless and refuses to clean up his sound.” — Marcus J. Moore, HipHopDX

Alice Smith has a gutsy soprano that whirls fiercely around your ears and burrows straight into your heart. When she hits that note, she balls up her fists and tightens her shoulders, as if she’s forcing the music into your soul.” — Marcus J. Moore, Washington Post

(Source: Washington Post)

"In the end, The Air Between Words works because of its chameleonic nature. Though the album scans as EDM, Martyn filters his creations through drum-n-bass and other traditional genres, making the sound into something deeper, something that rests outside the usual confines of instrumental music and within the realm of spiritual expression.” — Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

(Source: washingtoncitypaper.com / THUMP)

"The fact that I’m so groove-oriented comes from playing in go-go bands and being in D.C. Also D.C. was a place where we could go play live—and if you were good, you were good. People didn’t have to know your music." — Meshell Ndegeocello, Washington City Paper 

"The fact that I’m so groove-oriented comes from playing in go-go bands and being in D.C. Also D.C. was a place where we could go play live—and if you were good, you were good. People didn’t have to know your music." — Meshell Ndegeocello, Washington City Paper 

"While D’Angelo fans wait for his next release, we have a new alternative to help us pass the time: Diggs Duke. The upstart Southwest D.C. musician’s infectious new song, “Secrets Seem Rehearsed,” sounds a lot like the neo-soul icon circa 2000.” — Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper 

(Source: washingtoncitypaper.com / Brownswood)

"What’s happening on the mainstream, I just don’t feel a lot of it. I think soul music as a whole should definitely line up with the spirit of what came before us, because that’s what makes it last.” — Cody ChesnuTT, Washington City Paper

"What’s happening on the mainstream, I just don’t feel a lot of it. I think soul music as a whole should definitely line up with the spirit of what came before us, because that’s what makes it last.” — Cody ChesnuTT, Washington City Paper

(Source: washingtoncitypaper.com)

"Hip-hop is not presented as a musical art. It’s presented as an image. Rappers aren’t presented as some of the nicest God-gifted musicians that ever graced the Earth.” — Homeboy Sandman, Washington City Paper

"Hip-hop is not presented as a musical art. It’s presented as an image. Rappers aren’t presented as some of the nicest God-gifted musicians that ever graced the Earth.” — Homeboy Sandman, Washington City Paper

“yU is in the best stride, and is one of the best rapper/producers on the planet right now. It’s just a shame that you don’t know it.
He doesn’t shy away from his personal struggle: having to stretch $5, and moving from one house to another. yU’s not ashamed of the circumstances, and he uses them as teachable moments for his listeners. It’s about time you stop and listen.” — Marcus J. Moore, WTOP News

yU is in the best stride, and is one of the best rapper/producers on the planet right now. It’s just a shame that you don’t know it.

He doesn’t shy away from his personal struggle: having to stretch $5, and moving from one house to another. yU’s not ashamed of the circumstances, and he uses them as teachable moments for his listeners. It’s about time you stop and listen.” — Marcus J. Moore, WTOP News

(Source: liveblog.wtop.com)

"With Reintroduction, Maimouna Youssef proves that she can have fun with her music and not be so serious. [It] blends the well-timed spontaneity of her live performances with the thoughtful authenticity of her studio work. It’s relatable, carefree, and smart.” — Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

"With Reintroduction, Maimouna Youssef proves that she can have fun with her music and not be so serious. [It] blends the well-timed spontaneity of her live performances with the thoughtful authenticity of her studio work. It’s relatable, carefree, and smart.” — Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

(Source: washingtoncitypaper.com)

"For The Infinite Void, [Bernard] Farley has said he wanted to journey through the universe and tell its story. He delivers with a set of cosmic, cavernous tunes that reach for the stars but, gratifyingly, don’t always rely on the cinematic touch that Farley so clearly loves to deploy.
Farley’s theme slowly comes into view as the album progresses, and even the dancefloor-ready bangers take a few listens to fully absorb. In attempting to explain the cosmos, Farley’s instead created his own utopia. Wherever it is, it’s beyond this world.”
— Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper

"For The Infinite Void, [Bernard] Farley has said he wanted to journey through the universe and tell its story. He delivers with a set of cosmic, cavernous tunes that reach for the stars but, gratifyingly, don’t always rely on the cinematic touch that Farley so clearly loves to deploy.

Farley’s theme slowly comes into view as the album progresses, and even the dancefloor-ready bangers take a few listens to fully absorb. In attempting to explain the cosmos, Farley’s instead created his own utopia. Wherever it is, it’s beyond this world.”

Marcus J. Moore, Washington City Paper